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Hire, onboard, and retain.


After a lot of time and energy, you’ve just hired a great person to provide customer service and reception for your phone support center.  Now it’s time to put the person to work, right?

No matter the company, 

hiring happens.


How do you as a manager make sure the right person gets the job and stays with your company? 

If you work in Human Resources, you have lots of fascinating stories. Here is a real hiring situation where the names have been changed to protect the innocent.


You hired Kendra from another call center in town.  She was really excited to accept the job because of the good work your healthcare company does.  She has a real interest in healthcare and a dream of possibly going to nursing school. Since she is getting paid $1.00 more an hour than her previous job, the extra pay helps her to save money towards her goal. Roberta is the lead and the most senior person for the team you are placing Kendra on, so she is tasked to train and onboard Kendra to her new job. Roberta has worked with you for five years and knows the company and the work really well, but recently, Roberta has lost a lot of motivation and seems unhappy. In the past, Roberta has always been dependable and is the most knowledgeable person on the team.  She had recommended a candidate for Kendra's job, but you did not hire the person she recommended. Roberta starts training Kendra.  Kendra is enthused and asks Roberta a lot of questions, but at times, Roberta just seems impatient with Kendra.  Kendra has observed Roberta being short with customers on the phone. Roberta never directly criticizes her, but Kendra doesn’t feel like she gets the information she needs to help her do a good job with her phone calls. Kendra reaches out to some other coworkers with questions, but they tell her, “oh don’t worry about it, you’ll be fine”.  Kendra finally realizes that things go better with Roberta and her new coworkers if she just keeps a low profile. Eventually, someone Kendra knows from church mentions to her a job at another health care company.  Kendra follows up and is offered a job at the same rate of pay.  On her three-month anniversary, she emails you her resignation letter.  You are completely stunned.  Whatever could have gone wrong?

How are you onboarding new employees? Why is onboarding so important?


Don’t minimize the impact of setting the right expectations and the resources needed for a new hire to succeed. The hiring process is too time consuming and expensive to have it derailed by the onboarding process or the lack thereof.  Your goal is not just to hire, but also to retain.  


What motivates your employees to work for you?  Pay is not the only motivator.  Kendra was motivated by the company’s mission, but the culture created by her team lead and her coworkers canceled out that enthusiasm. Cut your hiring cost by retaining the employees that are an asset to your company.

Hiring, onboarding and retaining employees is one of the most vital processes in a business.

We can help. 

MGMTinsight is committed to ensuring your hiring process gets and retains the best employees. Contact us today for more information.

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